Photo 29 Jul 2,061 notes seebeyondthesex:

unjardinpublic:

yeahbdgdfabyyeah:

All my life I’ve felt like I was living my life I’m the wrong body. My gender was almost correct (I switched to critical-female last month), but my race and ethnicity was completely wrong. I was born white with pure European ancestry, but I’ve always found myself liking rap music, fried chicken, and I could run really fast. I loved basketball and watermelon has been my favorite scent of all time. As I grew older, society and media taught me that these interests are not typical of a white person such as myself. My interests were more normal for black people. I felt ashamed to eat chicken in front of my family, scared to wear my favorite watermelon body mist, and scared to show my basketball skills on the playground (because I was white and a female and we all know how females aren’t supposed to show their athletic skill in public) When I was in high school I really wanted to join the track team but I was so scary to try out because I knew I would be ridiculed by my white peers for betraying my own race and by my black peers for trying to encroach onto their territory. I allowed my racial dysphoria to dictate my life for too long.
Last week I have came to the realization that just because my skin is white and I am “genetically” (genetics is a social construction) Caucasian, that doesn’t mean I am white. I’m black. All the signs are there and I feel black, therefore, I am trans-black. Yesterday I decided to embrace my new identity and wear blackface out in pubic. I went to the mall so I could buy some outfits that were less white and conservative and guess what… I faced nothing but oppression and ignorance. I was told I was a racist biggot by black and white people. Why wold I be racist against my own race??? I’ve never felt so horrible in my life. People have no idea how much I’ve suffered my whole life, hiding who I really am from everyone. I have no friends of family for support and nobody knows the real me. They have no idea how much courage it took for me to wear my blackface out un public. No, it’s not blackface, it’s my identity. All these cis-ethnic scum degraded me for finally wearing my identity on my face. What I hope to accomplish from this post is to prove to the world that trans-black is real and we have real emotions. So please read and share my story and help me educate the oppressors out there.

Wait

Please tell me this isn’t serious

….im not sure if this is a joke oooorrr….

seebeyondthesex:

unjardinpublic:

yeahbdgdfabyyeah:

All my life I’ve felt like I was living my life I’m the wrong body. My gender was almost correct (I switched to critical-female last month), but my race and ethnicity was completely wrong. I was born white with pure European ancestry, but I’ve always found myself liking rap music, fried chicken, and I could run really fast. I loved basketball and watermelon has been my favorite scent of all time. As I grew older, society and media taught me that these interests are not typical of a white person such as myself. My interests were more normal for black people. I felt ashamed to eat chicken in front of my family, scared to wear my favorite watermelon body mist, and scared to show my basketball skills on the playground (because I was white and a female and we all know how females aren’t supposed to show their athletic skill in public) When I was in high school I really wanted to join the track team but I was so scary to try out because I knew I would be ridiculed by my white peers for betraying my own race and by my black peers for trying to encroach onto their territory. I allowed my racial dysphoria to dictate my life for too long.

Last week I have came to the realization that just because my skin is white and I am “genetically” (genetics is a social construction) Caucasian, that doesn’t mean I am white. I’m black. All the signs are there and I feel black, therefore, I am trans-black. Yesterday I decided to embrace my new identity and wear blackface out in pubic. I went to the mall so I could buy some outfits that were less white and conservative and guess what… I faced nothing but oppression and ignorance. I was told I was a racist biggot by black and white people. Why wold I be racist against my own race??? I’ve never felt so horrible in my life. People have no idea how much I’ve suffered my whole life, hiding who I really am from everyone. I have no friends of family for support and nobody knows the real me. They have no idea how much courage it took for me to wear my blackface out un public. No, it’s not blackface, it’s my identity. All these cis-ethnic scum degraded me for finally wearing my identity on my face. What I hope to accomplish from this post is to prove to the world that trans-black is real and we have real emotions. So please read and share my story and help me educate the oppressors out there.

Wait

Please tell me this isn’t serious

….im not sure if this is a joke oooorrr….

Photo 29 Jul 341 notes losttomyownself:

How To Have A Rational Discussion
I need to follow this chart

losttomyownself:

How To Have A Rational Discussion

I need to follow this chart

Video 29 Jul 113,814 notes

maddi-mara-bell:

peaceypanic:

surfer-rosa3:

carlboygenius:

Hemp is a Sensible, Sustainable, Highly-Industrializable Plant

We should utilize it. Hemp could solve many problems.

END PROHIBITION. It is NOT just about smoking.

YEP.

AMEN.

AMEN AMEN AMEN.

Praise.

Video 28 Jul 276,097 notes

sexloveandnerdystuff:

YouTuber albinwonderland discusses the term ‘fake geek girl’ and why it shouldn’t exist, and nails it. The video can be found here.

(Source: undergroundmindpalace)

Video 28 Jul 333,051 notes

quiet-desperati0n:

I am a feminist because
I don’t think this video could be much more relevant.

(Source: vodkaand-cigarettes)

Text 28 Jul 98 notes

oldbottleofcrow said: Hello. I like your work and have been following Meaty Yogurt. I have an unrelated question: What are your thoughts on the potential Wonder Woman costume choices in the upcoming movie? I would like your opinion on the question of objectification question v. connection to canonical DC comics lore. (There is a mildly thoughtful, but ultimately male oriented video I just watched that I can't link to you here that made me wonder)

rosalarian:

It’s kinda hard to tell what this costume is because the image is so dark. The whole costume looks brown, and I don’t see much familiar iconography. I could complain about the high heels, or the short skirt, but it actually looks far less objectifying than Adrianne Palicki’s Party City costume that had full leg coverage and flat heels. After that, looking at this, I just see a lot of power. I just wish every superhero movie didn’t have to be so dark and gritty these days. I’m hoping this costume looks more unique than Xena 2.0 when seen in better lighting.

I saw someone mention how it looks like Wonder Woman is gonna do all the actual day saving while Batman and Superman fight, and I would love that. Those two guys just fighting each other, oblivious to some terrible crisis, and Diana is just like “Guys? Guys? We need to- Hey, guys! Oy vey, I’ll just do it myself.”

I saw this photo on a facebook page and someone in the comments had removed the filter they had put on and the costume looked sooooo much better! I mean still Xenaesque but it had her colours. Im hoping its just the filter they used on the photo.

Video 27 Jul 78,626 notes

babylonian:

a fun way to start the day is by getting a call from a robot pretending to be a human

I think he broke it.

Video 27 Jul

Our brand new TARDIS! We got it for free! We just need to repaint it, add two more sides, and fix it up a bit and it’ll be beautiful!!!

Video 27 Jul 120,659 notes

(Source: sydneythefangirl)

Photo 27 Jul 9,242 notes hollabackboston:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.
A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.
When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.
She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.
Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.
Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.
Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

hollabackboston:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.


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